2 comments
  1. preciosidad!…me encantas!….muaks!…requetemuaks!

  2. Tan preciosa como siempre, irradias mucha naturalidad, me encantan tus fotos, y, en general tu trabajo y blog!

    Muchas felicidades y que todo siga yéndote de maravilla! 🙂

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Meanwhile in Australia: day 1

Can someone help me to translate this post from Spanish? 🙂 I’m travelling at the moment and it’s quite difficult to stop and do it!!!

If you can post the translation on the comments I would be so happy 😀 thank you!!!!

2 comments
  1. no naked photos or running around naked in the outback? not even naked underwater in the Great Barrier Reef?

    no hay fotos desnudas o corriendo desnudo en el interior? ni siquiera bajo el agua desnuda en la Gran Barrera de Coral?
    ¿No hay desnudos o corriendo desnuda en el desierto? No incluso desnudos submarina en la gran barrera de coral.

    http://translate.google.com

    Meanwhile in Australia : day 1

    Start with posts by relating my adventures on the other side of the world 🙂

    As I told you in a previous post, I came on October 30 (the day after my birthday !) To marvelous Melbourne to be working for two weeks with all the producers that I could find, saving money to finance this being the best trip of my life.

    We take these weeks of hard to go making a mental plan of what we wanted to see and places where we could get there work. Australia is a beautiful country, but it covers an area of ​​stunning grounds, and two and a half month journey ahead would have to see exactly where to turn.

    Before coming here I got me out my Open Water license, which allows me to dive independently, so a stop at the Great Barrier became mandatory. For this we needed to go through Cairns, Pourt Douglas, or any big city in the area of Northwest Coast.
    Furthermore, it was essential to visit Kakadu National Park, a national park the size of Catalonia, at the top end of Australia ‘s Northern Territory .
    We were putting points on the map, and the option that seemed most logical was to take the road along the east coast, passing through Sydney, Brisbane and Cairns, trying to climb the uncharted territory of Cape York, continue west through the Savannah Way Katherine and climb up to Kakadu National Park and Darwin, finally going to the west, in the area of Kimberley. After arriving in Broome, we would start the trip back to Melbourne across the continent through the desert, through Alice Springs and Uluru.

    Pongo little map for everything that has anything more sense:

    After tracing the route of the trip, we began to think about the details Where we sleep? As the plan was to go traveling across all national parks, sleeping in nature seemed the best option.
    But Australia has crocodiles, scorpions, deadly spiders and virtually all the most venomous snakes in the world, so sleeping at ground seemed an acceptable idea. And inside the car, the tropical temperatures would probably asarnos us in our own juices. Then we found the tent roof, a tent attached to the roof rails of the car, so that opens up to about two feet off the ground, you can access it via a small staircase.

    When we had made ​​backpacks, shop and installed a thousand cans of tuna (protein food essential on any trip with lots of movement) purchased. When we had all set and ready to go … and the rains began.
    This is summer, and the climate of Melbourne not known for being extremely hard at this time, so everyone was surprised with the terrible tropical storm we had over our heads. After waiting a few days for the rain to subside without success, we decided to begin the journey in the middle of the storm.

    So, on Wednesday, November 13th at 15:30 we went to Melbourne with a huge rain and an even bigger jam. What had been until now our roommate (Terri Ann , a wonderful Australian woman who behaved great with us) left us a couple of muffins prepared paths with little notes of farewell.

    When leaving the metropolis discovered that we all main roads are blocked due to flooding. There are areas where the water is a foot to cover the road, so we have to move with the car splashing into the driveway, and the rain pattering on the windows .

    Dirijiendonos drive through back roads to the east, but without much idea of ​​where we would spend the night, or what to do if the storm worsened. Zizagueando roads between Cape Liptrap and we got to enjoy the sunset at the lighthouse, while the rain fell.

    Back and already dark, we see some shadows across the road, well ahead of our vision reaches far Are animals? We reduce the car’s speed until, very slowly, with lights illuminating got one animal a wombat! A giant guinea pig and hard hair. You are looking at us from the side of the road without it curiously unperturbed by our presence too. I try to shoot some photos for failed, and when Zor out of the car for a closer look Plop! disappears from a jump herbs having behind [disappears behind bushes?].

    We follow the path to the site of Wilsons Promontory Park, cruzándonos with a couple of wild wallabies, wombats and a few others. [crossing us were a couple of wild wallabies, wombats and a few others].

    As we have never opened before the tent roof, it ‘s pouring rain, and it is night, we prefer to deal with it the next day. Cojemos our sleeping bags, and arrejuntamos us inside the car, where we slept like logs until the next morning.

    http://www.bing.com/translator

    Meanwhile in Australia: day 1

    Beginning with the posts about my adventures in the other part of the world 🙂

    As I already told you in a previous post, I came on 30 October (one day after my birthday!) to the wonderful Melbourne, to be working for two weeks with all the producers that I could find, saving money to finance that this is the best trip of my life.

    We take those weeks of intense work to go to make a mental plan of which sites we wanted to see and by where you could get there. Australia is a beautiful country, but covers an extension of impressive terrain, and with two and a half months of journey ahead would have to see exactly where to direct us to.

    Before coming here I got out I my Open Water license, which allows me to dive autonomously, so a stop at the great barrier reef was made compulsory. For this we needed pass by Cairns, Pourt Douglas, or any large area of northwest coast city.
    In addition, it was essential a visit to Kakadu National Park, a national park the size of Catalonia, at the upper end of the Australian Northern Territory.
    We were putting points on the map, and that seemed most logical choice was to take the road along the East Coast, passing through Sydney, Brisbane and Cairns, try to climb the unexplored territory of Cape York, continue westward through the Savannah Way to Katherine and upload to Kakadu National Park and Darwin, finally going to the West, in the Kimberley area. Upon arrival in Broome, we would start the trip back to Melbourne across the continent through the desert, passing through Alice Springs and Uluru.

    I put little map for everything said has more sense:

    View larger map

    Once traced the route of the trip, we started to think about the details where to sleep? As the plan was to go traveling across all national parks, sleep in the nature seemed the best option.
    But Australia has crocodiles, scorpions, deadly spiders and virtually all snakes more venomous on the planet, so sleep at ground level did not seem an acceptable idea. And inside the car, the tropical temperatures probably would us to roast us in our own juices. Then find the roof tent, a tent coupled with Rails to the rack of the car in such a way that opens to about two meters from the ground, and can access it via a small staircase.

    wpid-IMG_20131109_135149

    When we had made backpacks, installed shop and bought thousand cans of tuna (protein food, essential for any trip with much movement). When we had everything ready and prepared to go out… began the rains.
    Here is summer, and the climate of Melbourne is not known for being extremely hard at this time, so everyone was surprised with the terrible tropical storm that we had on our heads. After waiting a few days to rain to abate with no success, we decided to begin the journey in the midst of the storm.

    Wednesday 13 November at 15:30 we left Melbourne with a huge rain and an even bigger jam. Which had been until this moment our roommate (Terri Ann, a wonderful Australian woman who behaved brilliant with us) left us prepared a couple of muffins with two farewell notes.

    wpid-IMG_20131113_192546

    Out of the metropolis, we discover that all major roads are cut off due to flooding. There are areas in which water arrives to cover half a meter of the road, so we have to move with the car splashing into the roadway, and intense rain rattling in the crystals.

    _MG_3960

    We drive through back roads dirijiendonos to the East, but without much idea of where would spend the night, or what to do if the storm worsened. Zizagueando between highways reached Cape Liptrap and enjoyed the sunset at the lighthouse, while rain fell.

    To the turn and now at night, we see some shadows across the road, quite ahead of far reaching our vision are animals? We reduce the speed of the car until we got very slowly, flashing lights one of the animals is a wombat! A species of giant Guinea pig and hard hair. It is us from one side of the road, with curiosity and without too unfazed by our presence. I try to shoot some photos form failed, and when Zor out of the car to see it up close plof! it disappears from a jump between the herbs with the back.

    We continue the journey to camping of Wilsons Promontory Park, crossing us with a couple of wild wallabies, and a few wombats.

    As we have never before opened the tent roof, it’s raining cats and dogs, and at night, we prefer to deal with it the next day. Cojemos Saints

  2. Will you be back in Melbourne?? I would love to buy yr panties.. Let me know

    I hope you are enjoying our big, beautiful country oxox

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